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Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy
Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy

Transboundary Environment, Climate, and Water

This set of Udall Center research projects is focused on transboundary ecological, climatic, and water systems, especially those shared by the United States and Mexico.

Current Projects

Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change (NOAA-SARP)
Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Project - Arizona (TAAP)
The Upper San Pedro River Basin
Use of Climate Diagnostics (IAI)

Adaptation and Resilience to Climate Change (NOAA-SARP)

golf courseThis project focuses on stakeholder-researcher engagement to develop regionalized adaptive water management strategies to reduce urban and rural vulnerabilities and build resilience to climate change. Working closely with urban water managers and civil preparedness planners in the Arizona-Sonora region, this project develops vulnerability assessments and site-specific adaptive management scenarios at multiple time horizons for specific urban areas.

See Udall Center’s NOAA-SARP project website

Udall Center Contacts
Robert G. Varady (520) 626-4393 rvarady@u.arizona.edu
Margaret Wilder (520) 626-7231 mwilder@email.arizona.edu
Christopher A. Scott (520) 626-4393 cascott@u.arizona.edu
Anne Browning-Aiken (520) 626-4393 browning@u.arizona.edu

Supported by
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Sectoral Applications Research Program (NOAA-SARP)

Photo by P. Vandervoet

 

Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Project - Arizona (TAAP)

TAAP
The TAAP originates from the Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Act and applies to the states of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona where four transboundary aquifers have been designated for priority assessment. TAAP-AZ is the Arizona component of assessment activities and is a collaborative effort of the U.S. Geological Survey, UA Water Resources Research Center, and Udall Center. A variety ofother U.S. and Mexican stakeholders participate in priority setting for the assessment process. TAAP-AZ is focused on compilation of scientific and other published materials in a searchable, online, bilingual database on groundwater resources within the transboundary Santa Cruz and San Pedro aquifers.

See the TAAP project website (containing project information in English and Spanish).

Udall Center Contacts
Christopher A. Scott (520) 626-4393 cascott@u.arizona.edu
Prescott Vandervoet (520) 626-4393 plv@email.arizona.edu

Supported by
The Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Act, U.S. Geological Survey, UA Water Resources Research Center and the Udall Center

Photo by P. Vandervoet

 

The Upper San Pedro River Basin

san pedroThe San Pedro, spanning the Arizona-Sonora border, is one of the last perennial streams in Arizona, and an important migration corridor for birds and other wildlife. But significant changes to the river are evident. For the first time in recorded history, a stretch of the San Pedro became dry and remained that way for eight days in 2005. Udall Center researchers have been working in the transboundary Upper San Pedro River basin for over 15 years, supported in part through initiatives like the UNESCO HELP (Hydrology for the Environment, Life and Policy) initiative and the Dialogue on Water and Climate. They have addressed topics such as community participation in water governance, binational stakeholder cooperation, social learning and adaptive management, and the interface between science and policy.

See 2006 bibliography of published Udall Center research on the Upper San Pedro [pdf].

Udall Center Contacts
Anne Browning-Aiken (520) 626-4393 browning@u.arizona.edu
Robert G. Varady (520) 626-4393 rvarady@u.arizona.edu

Drawing by anonymous Sonoran student

 

Use of Climate Diagnostics (IAI)

IAIThis human dimensions project supported by the IAI improves understanding of the combined impacts of East Pacific cyclones and the North American Monsoon on human systems, and mobilizes this knowledge to disseminate climate and water information to decision-makers, managers, and water users.

See Udall Center’s IAI project website (available in English and Spanish)

Udall Center Contacts
Christopher A. Scott (520) 626-4393 cascott@u.arizona.edu
Robert G. Varady (520) 626-4393 rvarady@u.arizona.edu
Anne Browning-Aiken (520) 626-4393 browning@u.arizona.edu

Supported by
Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI)

NASA image