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On November 17, 2018, Udall Center researchers, Andrea Gerlak and Adriana Zuniga, in collaboration with their partners Joaquin Murrieta from Watershed Management Group and Claudio Rodriguez and Nelda Ruiz from Tierra y Libertad Organization, led a team of volunteers in the implementation of green infrastructure at Star Academic High School. More than 80 volunteers that included high school students and teachers, Joint Technological Education District students and instructors, and University of…
On a cool morning in mid-November, about two dozen volunteers and students work in a shallow basin behind Star Academic High School, a school on Tucson’s south side, shoveling out piles of dirt and placing rocks in front of a drainage designed to capture rainwater from the school’s roof. One teenage girl uses a hammer drill on the hard dirt, creating a hole big enough for a young tree, while other students spread mulch and plug native grasses into the basin.
Green infrastructure (GI) – or spaces with permeable surfaces dominated by vegetation – has been shown to have numerous positive community benefits. Some local city governments in the United States have realized the benefits of GI, and along with neighborhood associations and NGOs have launched special programs to promote GI development. However, adoption of such infrastructure in Tucson, Arizona, has not been spatially uniform. Most notably, low-income communities within the poorer, south side…
The University of Arizona (UA) Green Fund recently awarded funding for the project “Addressing environmental injustice around green infrastructure in Tucson, Arizona.” Led by Adriana Zuniga (CAPLA and Udall Center) and Andrea K. Gerlak (School of Geography and Development and Udall Center), the project seeks to address environmental injustice around green infrastructure in Tucson by designing, implementing and evaluating a green infrastructure project at STAR Academic High School.